published by Del Mar Community Alliance. Inc.

Inside the MAY 2020 Print Issue

Click on cover for the MAY 2020 print issue in pdf format.


COVID-19 articles are marked by a red dot.


Video Visits
Julie Maxey-Allison


EDITORIAL: Better Living Through Science


Are you Immune?
Don Mosier, MD, PhD


eElixir
Betty Wheeler


Roving Teen Reporter:
Quarantine Quandaries

Dhathry Doppalapud


Beach Safety
Dwight Worden


Smile Awhile
Bud Emerson


Eating Out at Home
Del Mar Village Association


Bat Crazy
Julie Maxey-Allison


Zoomzanity
Don Mosier


Fuel the Front Line
Lauren Grove


C-19 Nuke Risk
Don Mosier


Neither snow nor rain nor heat...
Virginia Lawrence


Going Going, ...
Julie Maxey-Allison


Del Mar Addresses $3 Million Revenue Shortfall
Tom McGreal


Coping Routines
Virginia Lawrence


Housing Production and Preservation
Karen Lare
Jas Grewal
Tracey Martinez


Housing Hopes
Ann Gardner


Blue Sky Views
Valérie Dufort-Roy


Farmers Market:
From Farm to Home

Leslie Robson


Corona Choreography
Linda Chisari


City Tightening
City Diet
Zonng EIR
Toss, don’t Flush.
Bleach Safety

Sand SCOUP
CAL Leaders


CERT Safety Survey
Charles (Cap) Pinney


Welcome Valérie
Julie Maxey-Allison


Remembering Freda
February 15, 1926 – March 31, 2020


Fair Turbulence
Betty Wheeler


Hybrid Home Habits
Jeff Barnouw


Pop-up Library Open Ann Gardner


Senior Techies
Betty Wheeler


Learning Online
Valérie Dufort-Roy


DMF: APRIL 2020
Ira Sharp


DMCC: April 2020
Ashley Simpkins


Extra copies of the Sandpiper are temporarily unavailable since all the locations where one could pick them up have been closed due to COVID-19.


Calendars

DM Calendar

DMCC Calendar

DMF Calendar

DM Village Association

Public Meetings

City Council

Design Review Board

Planning Commission

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MAY 2020

Update
05/27/2022

PREVIEW
June 2020 Print Issue
Click on cover for the JUNE 2020 print issue in pdf format.

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Update
05/02/2022

Del Mar Farmers Market to Re-open May 9

The Del Mar Farmers Market is scheduled to re-open Saturday, May 9, 2020, from 1:00 - 4:00 p.m. in the outdoor parking lot at 1050 Camino Del Mar / Civic Center. Come and enjoy shopping for local fresh produce, seafood and international cuisine to support the farmers and other vendors as we all adjust to the "new normal" of six foot distancing and mask wearing. Preorders and pickups are encouraged to expedite the time spent in a public space.

The list of vendor contact information can be found by signing up for the weekly E-blast under ‘Market News and Vendor updates’ on delmarfarmersmarket.org

 
Update
05/04/2022

Del Mar beaches to open on Monday May 4

The City Council voted 5-0 on Friday to open Del Mar's beaches at dawn on Monday for individual active exercise only and with numerous restrictions to ensure social distancing.

The public's cooperation is required in order for the beach to remain open and individuals may be cited for violating the rules. Extraordinary circumstances, such as orders from State or County officials, also could close the beaches.

The limited opening -- which coincides with expected openings on Monday of State-controlled beaches and beaches in Solana Beach and Carlsbad -- calls for visitors to stay six feet apart from non-household members on the sand and in the ocean.

A number of parking areas, including street parking at the North Beach and the main lot at 17th Street, will remain closed except for disabled spaces. Summer rules for dogs will apply.

Details from City website:  

Beach Safety
Dwight Worden
 
May Print Issue
Coping with COVID-19
Video Visits
Julie Maxey-Allison
 
Interview with G. Stuart Mendenhall, MD
Cardiologist at Scripps Memorial Hospital La Jolla

JMA: Working as a cardiologist, in our time of COVID-19, what, now, are your “on call” hours?
GSM: At Scripps Memorial - La Jolla we have delayed all elective or non-emergency procedures to minimize exposure or transmission of the coronavirus in the hospital, in addition to keeping facilities, rooms, ICU beds and ventilators free in the event there is a surge of COVID-19 patients requiring hospitalization. Unfortunately, there have been a few doctors who have exhibited symptoms of the disease and have been immediately removed from clinical service.
I have been asked to cover other shifts frequently, and fortunately I have had no symptoms. Despite being a sub-specialist, now I have been helping with general cardiology. If there is a need, I may function as a floor medicine doctor or staff the intensive care unit. Many of us have been going back and familiarizing ourselves with modern ventilator modes, which have changed since I was in residency!

more

  
May Print Issue
EDITORIAL: Better Living Through Science

Ignore the science about the COVID-19 and you may die; ignore the science about climate change and your children may die.

Most scientists are apolitical; they assume that policy decisions will be based on the best available science. That did not happen in the U.S. response to COVID-19 until the rising number of deaths made the toll of scientific ignorance clear. The anemic response to the rising threat of climate change has ignored the scientific consensus for years. Might policymakers learn from the COVID-19 disaster and be more prepared to listen to scientific advice?

There have been multiple warnings about pandemics since the AIDS virus spread worldwide in the mid-1980s. The most likely culprit was thought to be a new influenza strain, and though new strains did emerge, none of them spread like the current coronavirus. We became complacent, ignored the warnings from scientists and epidemiologists, and trusted that new vaccines and medicines would protect us. Remember that a new AIDS vaccine was promised by Margaret Heckler (Health and Human Services Secretary under President Reagan) “within a year” in 1984, and none exists today. Development of treatment for AIDS took almost a decade. There is a strange dichotomy in thinking: we don’t listen to scientists when they warn us of looming disasters, yet we have unrealistic expectations that they will develop miracle cures when a new disease emerges.

more

 
May Print Issue
eElixir
Betty Wheeler
My book club has moved to Zoom. The host normally provides food and drinks. For our April meeting, our clever host set up an account with Elaixir, sent a menu link around, and invited us to order our refreshments of choice and put it on her “book club” account, and we could then pick up our order individually before our online meeting. We had a terrific discussion of Susan Orlean’s The Library Book, and our “new normal” was reasonably close to our “old normal.”
 
May Print Issue
Del Mar Addresses $3 Million Revenue Shortfall
Tom McGreal

On April 20th the City Council unanimously approved additional budget cuts to cover the revenue shortfall of $3 million projected for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2020 (FY20). The revenue shortfalls largely pertain to TOT (hotel tax), sales tax, parking revenue and facility rentals.

At the April 6th Council meeting, the Council approved budget cuts totaling $1.1 million and on April 20th after a more complete review, an additional $1.9 million were recommended. Below is a summary of the overall cuts for fiscal year 2020:

more

 
May Print Issue
Neither snow nor rain nor heat Virginia Lawrence
 
... nor gloom of night nor COVID-19 stays these couriers from the
swift completion of their appointed rounds.
 
Lawrence (Larry) Abrenica, Del Mar Post Office letter carrier.
Same route for 26 years, now with gloves and mask.
Photo Virginia Lawrence.
 
May Print Issue
  Farmers Market
From Farm to Home
Leslie Robson

The City of Del Mar responded rapidly to the coronavirus pandemic, closing all city properties, including City Hall, beaches, parks, among others. One of the casualties of the closure of the Civic Center was the Del Mar Farmers Market. March 14 was the last market, back when less than 250 people could convene in one place. It seems so long ago.

The State of California, along with San Diego County, has deemed farmers markets essential businesses and has established specific safety rules for farmers and customers. The rules encompass limiting the numbers of people, hygiene and sanitation, spacing of vendors and social distancing of customers, just to list a few.

more

 
May Print Issue
Smile Awhile
Bud Emerson

My wife and I have a new routine for happy hour: 30-40 minutes on back patio taking turns on stationary bike, hand weights, stomach crunches. Followed by glass of wine celebrating sunset.

The online joke network keeps us laughing with jokes and videos. We always watch something humorous on TV before we go to sleep every night.

 
May Print Issue
Going Going, ...
Julie Maxey-Allison
Making crackers—not a great hit.
Eating from the garden—about gone.
   
May Print Issue
Zoomzanity
Don Mosier
   

Zoom parties with our friends and kids help keep us sane.
I’m still adapting to seeing my face when I’m talking.

 
May Print Issue
Pop-up Library Open
Ann Gardner
   
 
Keep reading.
Photo Ann Gardner.
  
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