published by Del Mar Community Alliance. Inc.

Inside the APRIL 2021 Print Issue

Click on cover for the APRIL 2021 print issue in pdf format.


Plants Capture Carbon
Dolores Davies Jamison

EDITORIAL: Charging Ahead

Six-Month Financial Results Looking Good
Tom McGreal

Resident Energy Choices
Don Mosier

Roving Teen Reporter:
Black Student Union

Neha Pubbi

  • Bluff Buttresses
  • Whither Winston

Cool Koll Brew
Julie Maxey-Allison

Seriously Sustainable Brew
Valérie Dufort-Roy

Housing Settlements
Bud Emerson

Ospreys: Baby Boom
Julie Maxey-Allison

You are vaccinated.
Now what?

Don Mosier, MD, PhD

NUKE Threat Strategy ???
Don Mosier

The Right to Repair
Valérie Dufort-Roy

The Winds of Change Julie Maxey-Allison

Young Person Profile:
Cello Challenges COVID

William Forrest

DMF APRIL 2021
Dreaming Big, Then Making It So: DMF’s founders Lou Terrell and Joel Holliday

DMCC APRIL 2021
Ashley Simpkins, Program Director


Extra copies of print issue available at the Farmers Market.

 

home | home page archives | APRIL 2021 home page
   

APRIL 2021

Update 04/28/2021


preview
of the may sandpiper
Click on cover for the MAY 2021 print issue in pdf format.

Click here to view page 7 Two Tunnel or Not Two Tunnel.

Support Us


Join our email list

Your email address here


Contact us
here

Search
here


Readers' page
here


 
 
Update 04/11/2021
Letters to the Editor
Misleading Statement in "Charging Ahead" Editorial

Dear Editor,

The statement in your editorial that, "... our electricity supply from SDG&E is currently less than 40% renewable, so charging your car with dirty energy defeats the goal of zero emissions", is misleading in several ways. Of course, 40% renewable is a whole lot better than 0% renewable for gas at the pump, but you miss other advantages that make electric cars much more efficient and environmentally friendly than their gas counterparts. First, electric cars burn less "fuel" because power plants run at roughly 38 - 60% thermodynamic efficiency versus 20 - 35% percent for cars. Second, electric cars don't burn gas or emit exhaust when parked in the daily traffic jam on I-5. Third, electric cars use regenerative braking to capture energy that goes completely to waste in gas cars. Yes, we need cleaner, more renewable energy from SDG&E, but electric cars are a big step in the right direction right now.

Joel F. Martin, Ph.D., Cordero Rd.

Reply from the Sandpiper

Joel,

Thanks for your comments. I agree with all your points. The point I was trying to make was that charging your EV with 100% renewable energy from CEA is an attractive option if you don't have rooftop solar. 

Don Mosier

 
 
Update 04/02/2021
Letters to the Editor
Praise for William Forrest's article
in April 2021 issue

Dear Editors,

William Forrest’s account of his cello practice during Covid19 was a delight to read.  His youthful optimism, self-discipline, and love of music shined through every sentence. To steal words from another kind of artist of a much earlier generation, it “has given my heart a change of mood and saved some part of a day I had rued.”  (In remembrance of Robert Frost's, “A Dust of Snow.”)

Jan McMillan, 12th St.

 
April Print Issue
Plants Capture Carbon
Dolores Davies Jamison | Crest Road

Surprise Garden. Photo Julie Maxey-Allison.
Longtime Del Mar resident Joanne Chory, a noted plant biologist at the Salk Institute, is helping to lead an ambitious effort to coax plants to capture and store more carbon dioxide than they normally would. In a recent zoom collaboration between the Del Mar Garden Club and the Salk Institute’s Women in Science program, Chory discussed and fielded questions on the Harnessing Plants Initiative, a significant endeavor aimed at genetically optimizing certain plants to grow deeper, more robust, and decomposition-resistant root systems, which will enable the plants to sequester more carbon in the soil for longer periods. The initiative has received significant funding from the Bezos Earth Fund.

“Humanity is at a crossroads,” said Chory. “We are now facing collapsed ecosystems and the effects of climate change, along with a burgeoning human population. If we don’t make all possible efforts to substantially reduce the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, we will be leaving our children and grandchildren to live in a much more dangerous and unhealthy world.”

more
 

April Print Issue


You are vaccinated.
Now what?

Don Mosier, MD, PhD

On March 8th, the CDC issued guidelines for individuals who have been fully vaccinated, meaning that at least 2 weeks have elapsed since their second dose of the Pfizer or Moderna vaccine, or the single dose of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine. These general recommendations acknowledge that we still have more to learn about COVID-19 transmission after vaccination, and the recommendations leave a lot of room for interpretation. Here are the recommendations with my comments in italics:

1. Fully vaccinated people can:

• Visit with other fully vaccinated people indoors without wearing masks or physical distancing – Great news, but safer if a small number of guests who have adhered to all precautions under #2 below and the meeting space is well ventilated. Including children in the gathering is not recommended, but all should be masked if they are present.

more

 
April Print Issue
EDITORIAL: Charging Ahead

Electric vehicles (EVs) have been around for over a decade, but they still represent less than 3% of registered vehicles in California. Governor Newsom has announced that 100% of light duty vehicles will be zero-emission vehicles (EVs and hydrogen fueled) by 2035. Although EV sales have been slow the last 2 years, there are indications that the market is improving as more choices of EV vehicles are available (68 different models are on sale in California now. The California Energy Commission reported that there were 395 EVs in the 92014 Zip code in 2018. That number is increasing rapidly with the Tesla 3 model one of the most popular vehicles in California; 130 EV sales were reported in our zip code in 2020.

What does this mean for Del Mar? We have two factors that reduce the environmental impact of buying an EV. The first is the fact that our electricity supply from SDG&E is currently less than 40% renewable, so charging your car with dirty energy defeats the goal of zero emissions. Yes, your car may have zero emissions, but your power plants have plenty. You can eliminate this problem if you have rooftop solar panels and can charge your car while the sun is shining. That brings us to the second problem in Del Mar; trees. Trees are great for the environment and for community character. However, if trees shade your roof, you may not have enough sunshine to make solar panels feasible. This leaves the options of charging at work or putting your charging system on a timer so your car charges at “super off-peak” rates (currently, midnight to 6 am weekdays).

more

 
Update 03/06/2021
Resident Energy Choices
Don Mosier | Rimini Road
Bill Comparison - Residential Rate
Carlsbad & Del Mar PCIA Vintage Customers
Cleaner energy is coming to Del Mar! The Del Mar City Council approved the default electricity product offered by the Clean Energy Alliance (CEA) at their March 15th Council meeting: the choice was 50% renewable/75% carbon-free (mainly hydroelectric) sources, matching the default products in Solana Beach and Carlsbad. The default electricity offering mean that you will be automatically enrolled with this energy choice unless you chose another option. This default product is still less expensive by about 65 cents per month for the average customer than the current 39% renewable product offered by San Diego Gas & Electric (SDG&E). Del Mar residents will be automatically enrolled in the CEA service in May or June at the default product price unless they choose to opt down to the 50% renewable product, opt up to the 100% renewable product at an extra charge of $2-3/month, or opt out and remain with SDG&E as their electricity provider.

more

 
April Print Issue
Stranded on Sand
Where’s My Ma?

Baby seal abandoned on shore.
Photo Julie Maxey-Allison.
 
April Print Issue
Housing Settlements
Bud Emerson | Klish Way

Finally, we have a housing plan. Actually we have two plans, both passed unanimously. One is the final piece of the plan for the last eight years (fifth element). The other is the proposed plan for the next eight years (sixth element).

After months of political pandering and finger pointing, out come two plans that not only escaped a last minute promise of severe sanctions from the state, but are rational, multi-faceted, balanced intentions to distribute all levels of housing throughout the community.

more

 

April Print Issue

Young Person Profile:
Cello Challenges COVID

William Forrest | 11 years old
William Forrest and his cello.
Photo Nicole Forrest.
When the Pandemic hit I felt trapped. Basketball stopped. School learning stopped. Gatherings stopped. I could not leave the house; I was scared because I did not know if I was going to get sick. Before the pandemic, I practiced cello. During the pandemic, I kicked it up a notch. I started working harder because I needed a way to cope and I had the free time. I started putting in the work.

A typical pandemic practice is pretty intense and long. Everyday, I start with warm-ups. I play the C major scale in different forms, arpeggio, double stops, and octaves. Then, I play Friedrich Doutzauer’s book of etudes, where I work on rhythm, intonation, and bowing technique. Now it is time for my main set.

more

  
Search our website
 
 


 
       

website by virginia lawrence
© 2007-2021 Del Mar Community Alliance, Inc.  All rights reserved.

a

a

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tru Cou S

 

 

ackli